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I have in my files the following biography of John Leasil Brasher, written by Kenneth J Brasher as the John L. Brasher family credential, and I don’t have any idea what that would be for.  Any information would be greatly appreciated.

 

JOHN LEASIL BRASHER

Grandfather John Leasil Brasher was the first of seven children born to Andrew Jackson Brasher and Temperence Goodwin Stone, offspring of sturdy pioneer people, who left Virginia and South Carolina and came to Kentucky.  Here they cleared forests and made large plantations Continue Reading »

Since no one has said I can’t post this, I will go ahead, hoping that I transcribed it correctly (and if I didn’t, someone will contact me about any necessary corrections).

Perdita Brockbank Guymon put her address at the bottom of this biography, but because this is a public blog, I’m not going to include it.

THE BIOGRAPHY OF JOHN LEASIL BRASHER

My Grandfather, John Leasil Brasher, was born on the 9th of August, 1843,  in Lyon County, Kentucky. His parents were Andrew Jackson Brasher and Temperence Goodwin Stone.

Grandfather was the oldest child of a family of seven. Their names Continue Reading »

First of all, I  found the following biography in “Prominent Citizens of Huntington” HISTORY OF SANPETE AND EMERY COUNTIES, pp 646, 647, 1898:

“Brasher, John L., farmer and local agent for the Co-op Wagon and Machine Company in Emery county, son of Andrew J. and Temperance, was born in Caldwell county, Kentucky, August 9 1843. His father owned a fine plantation and he grew up on the farm. Just before the fall of Fort Donelson he enlisted in the Confederate Army Continue Reading »

Once I had been bitten, I had to get to work.  I organized all of the information I had been given so that I could see what we knew (first step in genealogy research, even though I didn’t know that at the time).  Then I found someone who could get me started.

Basically, what she told me was the kind of records available, and which she would look in first, and which next.  My main research method Continue Reading »

After I received the copy of John Stone’s will, I wrote to Captain Stone’s granddaughter and asked her to send me a photocopy of the family bible she had shown me when we visited her. I believe it originally belonged to her great-grandmother, Nancy Killen Stone.

She was kind enough to do so, and I have attempted to transcribe it below.  I apologize if the format seems strange.  I wanted to show it as close to how it was written down as possible.  There are several different handwritings in this bible, as might be expected.

I have added links at the bottom of each page to a pdf file of the photocopy of that page. If I were to include each page as a photograph, I think it would take too long for this post to load.

page 1
Family Record
Marriages (first column)
Leasil Stone and his
wife Nancy Stone
were married August 21st
in the year of our Lord
A D 1822 Continue Reading »

The copy of John Stone’s will, which I mentioned in my previous post, is a photocopy of the handwritten original, with capitals in various places, an extra “and” in one place, a strike-out, a couple of insertions (indicated below with carats), and other such writing.  I can probably scan it to make four jpeg files (it’s on two legal-sized pages) in order to make it legible, but for now, I thought I’d just post a transcription of it here.

In the name of God Amen.  I John Stoan
of the County of Caldwell & State of Kentucky
being weak in body- But of sound & perfect
memory and understanding- now calling to mind
the mortality of my Body- and knowing that
it is appointed of God; that all flesh once must
die- do make ordain and declare this my last will
and testament; and desire it to be Recd by all Continue Reading »

I used to think that people who were interested in genealogy were a little strange, maybe even a little obsessive.

That all changed after a trip through Kentucky way back in 1982.  My mother had told me about an ancestor she thought I might like to write about.  He had lost his leg while serving as a confederate soldier in the War between the States, and after reading his autobiography, which I may actually post sometime in the future, I agreed with her.  His story was very interesting.

I called the public library in his home town to see if they had any old newspapers, and was told they did not, but the library in the next county might.  I didn’t want to go to the library in the next county.

Then I called back and asked if they had any information on Captain William Johnston Stone.  The librarian said, “Funny you should ask that.  There was a man in here a few minutes ago, telling us all about him.”  Continue Reading »